Last Week In Books: All My Ruff Ryders, Meet Me Outside

It’s rare that I use this space to highlight anyone outside of the world of literature, but I think I have to make an exception this week for Earl Simmons, aka DMX. While he did pen an autobiography, he wasn’t known for his book. Still, he lived a dichotomous, tortured, nakedly expressive life on parContinue reading “Last Week In Books: All My Ruff Ryders, Meet Me Outside”

[REVIEW] The Passion According To Carmela, by Marco Aguinis (translated by Carolina De Robertis)

(Buy it HERE.) 🌟🌟🌟🌟 This book sat on my Kindle at 35% for months, because frankly, the first 3rd of this book is pretty obnoxious. It starts as a whimsical love story between two privileged elites playing at revolution in Bautista-era Cuba in order to relieve themselves of their pampered boredom and exercise their intellectualContinue reading “[REVIEW] The Passion According To Carmela, by Marco Aguinis (translated by Carolina De Robertis)”

[REVIEW] The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly, Sun-Mi Hwang

(Buy it HERE.) ⭐⭐⭐⭐(4/5) “The important thing is to understand each other. That’s love!” This book follows Sprout, a pathetic old laying hen with a big heart and a dream. She survives a terrifying coop cull and embarks on a new life in the fields as a free hen. Her lowly circumstances don’t keep herContinue reading “[REVIEW] The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly, Sun-Mi Hwang”

[REVIEW] A Black Guy Was Sitting Next To Me On The Subway, Yerong

(Buy it HERE(e-book only)) Yerong is a South Korean kindergarten teacher– sweet, intelligent, creative and reasonably aware of social issues. One day she meets Ghanaian scientist Manni and her eyes are opened to the realities of being an immigrant and a black person in a society that values conformity and often puts white Europeans onContinue reading “[REVIEW] A Black Guy Was Sitting Next To Me On The Subway, Yerong”

[REVIEW] Kim Ji-Young, Born 1982, by Cho Nam-Joo (translated by Jamie Chang)

(Buy it on Bookshop HERE.) /5⠀ I feel so many ways about this book. Let me start by saying that this is not an enjoyable read at all, but it is important. It isn’t dramatic, but it is realistic. And it isn’t entertaining, but it is necessary, I think. ⠀ Kim Ji-Young was the mostContinue reading “[REVIEW] Kim Ji-Young, Born 1982, by Cho Nam-Joo (translated by Jamie Chang)”