Last Week In Books: Yo Mama’s So Nice Nobody Can Write A Dramatic Best-Selling Novel About Her

Happy Mother’s Day to all my fellow readers who’ve added extra pages to their family books! I’ve been trying to think of my favorite literary mothers all day…and failing. Healthy parental relationships are not often the stuff of literature, are they? Still, here’s hoping you and yours had a fabulous day. Also, for those ofContinue reading “Last Week In Books: Yo Mama’s So Nice Nobody Can Write A Dramatic Best-Selling Novel About Her”

[REVIEW] Queenie, by Candice Carty-Williams

(Buy it from Bookshop here.) I want to fight Queenie. Okay, maybe not fight. Not physically, anyway. I just want to take her out for coffee and a very stern junior auntie-in-training chat about her life and her choices, ending with one question–“Girl, why don’t you love yourself at all?” She’s twenty-five, works at aContinue reading “[REVIEW] Queenie, by Candice Carty-Williams”

Ten For The Times: A Social Justice Booklist To Keep Us Moving Forward

Where do I even begin with today, fellow readers? I woke up suddenly at 5 am Korean time on April 20th, only to find that the Derek Chauvin verdict would be read in an hour. I fixed myself a cup of tea and sat, thinking, waiting. I wasn’t expecting much–the USA has done a remarkableContinue reading “Ten For The Times: A Social Justice Booklist To Keep Us Moving Forward”

[REVIEW] The Secret Lives of Church Ladies, by Deesha Philyaw

(Buy it from Bookshop) *sigh* I don’t think this collection of short stories was meant for me, y’all. I wanted it to be. Nine stories about Black women and their connections to themselves and the church seemed right up my alley, and I was genuinely excited to get into this and see myself and myContinue reading “[REVIEW] The Secret Lives of Church Ladies, by Deesha Philyaw”

Last Week In Books: All My Ruff Ryders, Meet Me Outside

It’s rare that I use this space to highlight anyone outside of the world of literature, but I think I have to make an exception this week for Earl Simmons, aka DMX. While he did pen an autobiography, he wasn’t known for his book. Still, he lived a dichotomous, tortured, nakedly expressive life on parContinue reading “Last Week In Books: All My Ruff Ryders, Meet Me Outside”

[REVIEW] This Is How You Lose The Time War, by Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone

(Buy it from Bookshop) This may be the unlikeliest romance novel I have ever read. Red and Blue are super soldiers in the time war, traveling across the 4th dimension bending history with violence and other influences. Somehow, they begin a mocking correspondence, taunting each other while busy sinking Atlantis and riding with Genghis KhanContinue reading “[REVIEW] This Is How You Lose The Time War, by Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone”

[REVIEW] Survivor, by Octavia Butler

(This novel is out of print. Find other works by Octavia E Butler HERE.) This novel was originally published in 1978. It’s been out of print since 1979–unlike all of Butler’s other novels, it’s never been reprinted, at her request. Don’t ask me how I got a copy or I’ll send you the bill. It’sContinue reading “[REVIEW] Survivor, by Octavia Butler”

[REVIEW] Homey Don’t Play That!: The Story of In Living Color and the Black Comedy Revolution, by David Peisner

(Buy it HERE.) I’m often grateful that I came of age during the 90s. While I didn’t have the easiest of childhoods (who did?) there was something magical about the Black cultural renaissance happening in that decade. Hip-hop, neo-soul, comedy, tv shows, literature, films–there was something special happening then and I’m glad it was theContinue reading “[REVIEW] Homey Don’t Play That!: The Story of In Living Color and the Black Comedy Revolution, by David Peisner”

[Review] M.C. Higgins, The Great, by Virginia Hamilton

(Buy it HERE.) I read this book because I felt like I was missing out on something. I’d heard nothing but glowing reviews of this from folks who read it in school and loved it. That, plus its inclusion on a lot of #blackboyjoylit lists made me expect this to be a very different middle grade coming-of-ageContinue reading “[Review] M.C. Higgins, The Great, by Virginia Hamilton”

[Review] Signs of Attraction, by Laura Brown

(Find it HERE.) There’s a lot of things I expect from romance novels, and intersectionality is not one of them. However, that’s exactly what this book offers and it’s an interesting surprise. Main girl Carli is a Hard Of Hearing undergrad from a troubled background. Main guy Reed, a handsome grad student, is not onlyContinue reading “[Review] Signs of Attraction, by Laura Brown”