See No Stranger, Valarie Kaur

(Buy it HERE.) Breathe and push.⠀⠀This book is so many things, and I loved them all. ⠀⠀It’s a manifesto–a revolutionary encouragement to love not only with community and caring, but with law, protests, and the pent up rage that comes from receiving injustice. It’s warm, empowering, & sharply attuned to our current times and theirContinue reading “See No Stranger, Valarie Kaur”

For Our Country, Fatemeh Farahani(published as Shahein Farahani)

(Download it for free HERE.) Woman’s the soul, and man the body of our countryWith soul and body linked, new life will have returnedto our country… In the landscape of weird that has made up 2020 so far, “Bailey’s is teaming up with The Women’s Prize For Fiction to work for progress in feminist publishing,”Continue reading “For Our Country, Fatemeh Farahani(published as Shahein Farahani)”

An Ember In The Ashes, Sabaa Tahir

(Buy it HERE.) 🔥⠀I’m usually pretty indifferent when it comes to YA fantasy. The genre is over-saturated and usually far too full of belabored love triangles and incompetent parents for me. I bought An Ember In The Ashes not knowing that it was young adult fiction–once I realized, I instantly lowered my expectations. However, thereContinue reading “An Ember In The Ashes, Sabaa Tahir”

If You’re Brown, Stick Around: Books About Colorism

If you’re Black, get back! If you’re brown, stick around. If you’re white, you’re alright! ~ Big Bill Broonzy Even though I make a conscious effort to read across genres, cultures, and time periods I still sometimes find myself stuck in thematic patterns. For months I’ll find myself somehow reading books that feature sharks orContinue reading “If You’re Brown, Stick Around: Books About Colorism”

Fairest, Meredith Talusan

(Buy it HERE.) Although I did my official Pride Month wrap-up a few days ago, I didn’t mention one of the LGBTQIA+ themed books I read, simply because I’ve had such a hard time deciding what to say about it. Is there a word for a book that everyone else seems to like, but youContinue reading “Fairest, Meredith Talusan”

The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly, Sun-Mi Hwang

(Buy it HERE.) ⭐⭐⭐⭐(4/5) “The important thing is to understand each other. That’s love!” This book follows Sprout, a pathetic old laying hen with a big heart and a dream. She survives a terrifying coop cull and embarks on a new life in the fields as a free hen. Her lowly circumstances don’t keep herContinue reading “The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly, Sun-Mi Hwang”

Whiter, edited by Nikki Khanna

(Buy it HERE). I think I was 14 or 15 the day a male relative(I honestly don’t even remember who) peered at me and said, “You know, you’re not light enough to be really beautiful, but you’re not too dark, either.” This is me: Now, granted, this is a remarkably good selfie with remarkably goodContinue reading “Whiter, edited by Nikki Khanna”

The Poppy War, Rebecca F Kuang

⭐⭐⭐⭐/5⠀⠀ First of all, yes, I know that’s not a poppy in the picture. There aren’t any growing in my neighborhood this year, unfortunately.⠀ Secondly, this review is a little spoiler-y. I won’t give away any major character-based plot points, but I will allude to a major event in the plot without giving any details.Continue reading “The Poppy War, Rebecca F Kuang”

When My Name Was Keoko, By Linda Sue Park

(Buy it HERE.) This middle-grade book by Newbery-medal-winning Korean-American author Linda Sue Park explores an episode of history that seems curiously underexposed if my own world history and Asian history classes in school are any indication. When My Name Is Keoko is set during the oppressive Japanese occupation of Korea in the 1940s. Pause forContinue reading “When My Name Was Keoko, By Linda Sue Park”

Kim Ji-Young, Born 1982, by Cho Nam-Joo(translated by Jamie Chang)

(Buy it HERE.) /5⠀ I feel so many ways about this book. Let me start by saying that this is not an enjoyable read at all, but it is important. It isn’t dramatic, but it is realistic. And it isn’t entertaining, but it is necessary, I think. ⠀ Kim Ji-Young was the most common babyContinue reading “Kim Ji-Young, Born 1982, by Cho Nam-Joo(translated by Jamie Chang)”